Category Archives: Mesopotamian

Taurus

Taurus
Etymology – The Bull

Taurus is a familiar zodiac symbol to many that represent power and strength. It is considered and believed that Taurus is one of the oldest constellations known to man, dating back to the Bronze Age and depictions found on cave walls.

Astronomy & Astrology

Much of the foundations of Western knowledge regarding the fields of Astronomy and Astrology owe its roots to Ancient Mesopotamian cultures. Many ancient cultures studied the stars, seeing in them patterns that are called constellations. These ancient astronomers were able to make predictable, annual turnings of the heavens that they could divide and mark for the passing of the Seasons and time. For the ancients, Astrology served as a precursor to Astronomy and they believed that by studying the heavens, they could foretell future events and even a person’s life path.

These ancient cultures would also meet and exchange ideas frequently and in this fashion, when the Greeks encountered the Persians, there was an exchange of knowledge regarding Astronomy that becomes the constellations and zodiacs so many know today. Eventually, there is no clear distinction between what ancient Mesopotamian Astronomers and Greeks Philosophers knew. Or who influenced who regarding the stories and myths behind the constellations. Even in current, modern times, the influence of these ancients is still known.

Western Astronomy

The Taurus constellation is Latin for “Bull.” This constellation is one of 48 constellations that were identified by Ptolemy, an astronomer who lived during the second century. It is the 17th largest constellation found in the night sky of the northern hemisphere. In modern times, Taurus is one of 88 known constellations and is bordered by the constellations of Aries, Auriga, Cetus, Eridanus, Gemini, Orion, and Perseus.

The constellation of Taurus is formed from two star clusters, the Hyades and Pleiades. When looking for the Taurus constellation in the night sky, the pattern of stars depicts only the front half of a bull. The reasoning is given is that the bull’s hindquarters are underwater as this image shows the Greek story of the white bull carrying Europa to Crete.

Further, it’s only in the imagination that the front quarters of the bull can be seen. The Hyades, a V-shaped grouping of stars form the face of Taurus, which have their own mythological story.

If you can find Orion in the night sky, follow his familiar three-star belt pattern to the right. You should be able to spot Alderbaran, the Bull’s Eye and then find the rest of this constellation.

The Taurus constellation has been called Al Thaur by the Arabs, Il Toro by the Italians, Le Taureau by the French, Taura by the Persians, and Shor by the Jews all of which mean the Bull in their respective languages.

Bronze Age

The Taurus constellation is believed to be one of the oldest constellations, known since at least the Early Bronze Age. It has been placed as dating to the Chalcolithic and possibly even the later Paleolithic eras. During this time, Taurus had marked the Spring Equinox between 4,000 B.C.E. to 1,700 B.C.E. which is also known as the Age of Taurus.

A Michael Rappenglück believes that depictions of the Taurus constellation and the Pleiades stars have been found in a cave painting at Lascaux, France. These paintings date back to 15,000 B.C.E. That both Taurus and the Pleiades are and have been known in many cultures as a bull and seven sisters gives cause for many paleontologists and astronomers to believe in a common origin and myth for their names.

Babylonian Mythology

In Babylonian astronomy, the Taurus constellation was listed in the MUL.APIN as GU4.AN.NA, meaning “The Heavenly Bull.” As Taurus marked the Vernal Equinox, it was the first constellation in the Babylonian zodiac and was referred to as “The Bull in Front.” The Akkadian name for Taurus was Alu.

In the Epic of Gilgamesh, an early literary work from Mesopotamia, Gilgamesh faces off against the Bull of Heaven after it was sent by the goddess Ishtar to kill him for spurning her advances. Gilgamesh is associated with the constellation of Orion. The two constellations of Orion and Taurus are often shown as being Gilgamesh and the Heavenly Bull in combat.

In early Mesopotamian art, the Bull of Heaven is connected in myths to Inanna, the Sumerian goddess of sexual love, fertility and warfare. One of the oldest depictions of the Heavenly Bull shows it standing in front of Inanna’s standard. It had three stars on its back; the cuneiform symbol for the “star-constellation” and archaeologists use this as good evidence that Taurus constellation is connected to Babylonian myths.

Buddhist Mythology

In Buddhist legends, Gautama Buddha had been born during a Full Moon in the month of Vaisakha, which coincides with the time of Taurus. The Buddha’s birthday is held and celebrated with the Wesak Festival or Vesākha. This happens during the first or second Full Moon while the Sun is in Taurus.

Druidic Mythology

The druids held an important religious festival involving bulls when the Sun passed through the Taurus constellation.

Egyptian Mythology

The Heavenly Bull of Babylonian myth is also found on the Dendera zodiac, an Egyptian bas-relief carved into the ceiling of a temple. In these early depictions, the bull’s horns are shown facing upward or backward. Later Greek depictions of Taurus show it pointed forwards.

For the Egyptians, the constellation of Taurus represented Osiris, a Sun god and in some accounts, his sister Isis. Both were represented by a bull and cow. As a bull, Osiris became known as the Bull-God Apis; seen as an aspect of the Sun god. Though worship of the Bull-God, Apis was worshiped in ancient Egypt at a much earlier time than Osiris. The priests of Apis would find a bull bearing the marks that would prove it embodied the soul of the deity. This bull was worshiped and cared for by the priests until it died and another bull was found bearing the marks of Apis.

Archaeologists in Memphis, Egypt found the ancient tomb of the Apis-bull. Inside the tomb is a broad paved avenue lined on either side by stone carved lions. On entering the tomb, a person passed through a long, high arched corridor with recesses carved into the rock wall on either side. Within the recesses were the entombed remains of the Apis-bulls.

Springtime is when the festivals honoring the Apis-bulls would occur. This was also the time of year when the Nile River has overflowed its banks, leaving the life-giving waters and silts behind for farmers to till and plant. The constellation of Taurus as a sacred bull was associated strongly with the renewal of life during Spring.

During this point and time of history, around 4,000 B.C.E., the Sun’s position in the heavens along the Zodiac rested on the first day of Spring, in the constellation we recognize now days as Taurus, the Bull. For many centuries, Taurus was the first constellation in the Zodiac and some scholars suggest that Taurus may have been the first Zodiac constellation invented.

Greek Mythology

Zeus and Europa

In Greek mythology, Zeus in many of his various affairs; had fallen love with Europa, the daughter of Agenor, a King of Tyre in ancient Phoenicia. The problem with Zeus getting close to show his affection is that Europa was always guarded by her father’s servants. Being a god and a shape-shifter, Zeus changed himself into the form of a handsome white bull with golden horns.

That accomplished, Zeus in his white bull form then mingles with the King’s royal herds grazing in a large field near the sea. While a walk along the beach, Europe noticed the handsome white bull and couldn’t resist going up to feed it. The bull was so very friendly and gentle, that Europe climbed up on its back when it lay down; taking hold of the golden horns.

Once she was on the bull’s back, it stood up and the white bull wandered closer and closer to the sea and then when they approached the beach, took off running for the water. Once in the sea, the bull starts swimming towards the island of Crete. And for Europa, it was too late to get off now.

When they arrived in Crete, Zeus changed back into his own form, revealing himself to Europa. As he’s already married to Hera, Zeus gives Europa instead in marriage to Asterius, the King of Crete.

In slightly different versions of this story, Zeus and Europa have three children together. One of whom is Minos who grows up and goes on to be a famous king of Crete. He had the palace in Knossos built where bull games were held and is more infamous for the sacrifice of fourteen youths (seven boys and seven girls) to his Minotaur in a labyrinth every year. In either event, Zeus is said to have commemorated the white bull he turned into by placing it up among the heavens as a constellation.

Io

An alternate story of the myth of Taurus holds that it the nymph Io, whom Europa is descended from. In this story, Io was changed into a cow in order to hide her from Hera during an affair with Zeus.

Cretan Bull

The Greek mythographer Acusilaus identified the constellation of Taurus as being the Cretan Bull, which was one of the Twelve Labors of Heracles.

Hebrew Mythology

For the Hebrews, Taurus was also the first constellation in their zodiac. It was represented by the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet as Aleph.

The Bull’s Eye and other Stars in Taurus

Aldebaran

The brightest star found in the Taurus constellation is Alpha Tauri or Aldebaran, from the Arabic language meaning: “The follower” (of the Pleiades). It is part of the group of stars known as the Hyades that form the Bull’s face. Aldebaranm being a giant red star, is seen as being the Bull’s bloodshot eye. This eye is often said to be glaring at the constellation of Orion the Hunter. Incidentally, Alderbaran is the 13th brightest star in the night sky.

The Chinese refer to Alderbaran as the Fifth Star of the Net. The Inuit call it the Spirit of the Polar Bear. The Seris of Mexico believe that Alderbaran provides light for seven women giving birth (the Pleiades). The Dakotas of North America saw Alderbaran as a hero chasing a white buffalo, again the Pleiades.

El Nath

The second brightest star in Taurus is Beta Tauri or El Nath, from the Arabic language meaning “the butting,” in reference to a bull butting someone with their horns.

Crab Nebula

A rather familiar nebula known as M1 (NGC 1952) or more popularly the Crab Nebula is found within the constellation of Taurus. The Crab Nebula is roughly 5,000 light years away from Earth. Astronomers say it is the remnant of a supernova that happened on July 4, 1054. This supernova was so bright it could be seen during the daytime and even has mention in Chinese historical records. The people of North America also saw this event and there is a painting of it on a canyon wall in New Mexico along with various pieces of pottery showing this event. Those archaeological finds weren’t discovered until 1731 by John Bevis.

The name of this nebula comes from its resemblance to a crab. The Crab Nebula is one of the most studied and well known Nebulas in the night sky. In 1968, a pulsar that emits radio waves at regular intervals was discovered. It’s figured the that this radio energy is the result of a dense neutron star.

Other famous nebulas found in Taurus include: Hind’s Variable Nebula (NGC 1555), the colliding galaxies NGC 1410 and NGC 1409, the Crystal Ball Nebula (NGC 1514), and the Merope Nebula (NGC 1435).

Crystal Ball Nebula

The Crystal Ball Nebula is found in the northern part of Taurus and to the northwest of the Pleiades. It gains significance as it was discovered by the German-born English astronomer William Herschel in 1790. Before this time, astronomers believed that nebulae were merely unresolved groups of stars. With Herschel’s discovery, he found that there are stars in a nebula’s center and that it is surrounded by a cloud of some sort. In 1864, the astronomer William Huggins figured out that this nebula is a luminous gas, not stars as previously supposed.

Hyades

The Hyades is a V-shaped group of stars that form the face of the Taurus constellation. The Arabs called to this group of stars the “Little she-camels.” In Greek mythology, the Hyades were five sisters of Atlas and thus, half-sisters to the Pleiades. The Hyades also had a brother, Hyas who was a great hunter. When he was killed by a wild boar, the sisters grieved. The sisters were later chosen by Zeus to care for his son, Dionysus, the god of Wine when his mother died. In a mixture of gratitude and pity, Zeus placed the sisters up into the night sky and despite their reward, the sisters still mourn for their dead brother.

Pleiades

The stars known as the Pleiades are another group of famous stars found in or associated with the Taurus constellation. They are known as the “Seven Sisters,” the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. In one myth, they were the companions of Artemis and when their father Atlas was given the task of holding the world on his shoulder, they became so grief-stricken that Zeus placed them up in the stars. A closely related myth to this, the hunter Orion fell in love with the seven sisters and pursued them endlessly. In order to save them, Zeus placed the sisters up in the Taurus constellation.

Astronomers have shown there to be many more stars then the initial seven. The star known as Aldebaran is considered the lead star of this group or cluster. It is estimated by astronomers that there may be 500-1000 stars in the Pleiades cluster, all of which are roughly 100 million years old. The stars though vary by size and only the largest stars in the Pleiades typically represent it.

Taurids

There are a couple of meteor showers that radiate from the Taurus constellation. They are the Taurids that occur in November and the Beta Taurids that occur in June to July during the day.

Zodiac

The constellation of Taurus is the third sign of twelve signs that form the Greek Zodiac. In more current and modern zodiacs, Taurus is the second sign of the zodiac. For those who study and are into the classical Greek Zodiacs, this time is typically said to be sometime from April 21 to May 20. The best time of year to see this constellation in the northern hemisphere is during the month of January at about 9 p.m. The planet Venus rules Taurus and the element of Earth is associated with this zodiac.

Taurus people, those born during the time of Taurus, are said to be both practical and stubborn. A Taurus tends to plod along at a steady pace when getting their goals and agendas done. So stubbornness can mean a great determination to get a job done right or a failure to see things any other way and seeing only one way to get their objectives done. When it comes to games, Taurus people love the rewards a game offers, they are also viewed as interested only in physical pleasure and material possessions. In that sense, Taurus people do enjoy a lot of physical contact and love creature comforts. With a Taurus’ love for the material, they can also be very sentimental in why they keep some items or the amount of affection they show on their loved one.

Pisces

Pisces

Etymology – Latin “Fishes”

The constellation of Pisces, while familiar to many as part of the Greek or Western Zodiac is also one of the earliest known signs. This constellation lies between Aquarius to the west and Aries to the east. While fairly large, Pisces is a faint constellation that can be difficult to spot in the night sky. Pisces is often seen as a pair of fish swimming in opposite directions and connected either at the tails or by a piece of cord or rope. Despite being a constellation that heralds the Spring, Pisces is a constellation best seen during Autumn and as such, it has the nickname of the Autumn Dipper.

Astronomy & Astrology

Much of the foundations of Western knowledge regarding the fields of Astronomy and Astrology owe its roots to Ancient Mesopotamian cultures. Many ancient cultures studied the stars, seeing in them patterns that are called constellations. These ancient astronomers were able to make predictable, annual turnings of the heavens that they could divide and mark for the passing of the Seasons and time. For the ancients, Astrology served as a precursor to Astronomy and they believed that by studying the heavens, they could foretell future events and even a person’s life path.

These ancient cultures would also meet and exchange ideas frequently and in this fashion, when the Greeks encountered the Persians, there was an exchange of knowledge regarding Astronomy that becomes the constellations and zodiacs so many know today. Eventually, there is no clear distinction between what ancient Mesopotamian Astronomers and Greeks Philosophers knew. Or who influenced who regarding the stories and myths behind the constellations. Even in current, modern times, the influence of these ancients is still known.

Western Astronomy

The Pisces constellation is Latin for “fish,” referring to the plural form of the word. This constellation is one of 48 constellations that were identified by Ptolemy, an astronomer who lived during the second century. In modern times, Pisces is one of 88 known constellations and it lies between the constellations of Triangulum, Andromeda, Pegasus, Aquarius, Cetus, and Aries. It is used to mark the end of the zodiac calendar and the Vernal or Spring Equinox. Many of the constellations bordering with Pisces are water-related and are located in an area of the sky known as the Sea or Water.

Babylonian Mythology

The constellation we know as Pisces is made up of two Babylonian constellations Zibatti-meš (or Šinunutu4 “the great swallow”) that’s the eastern part of Pisces and KU6 (“the fish, Ea,” Piscis Austrinus), presumably the western part. In the first Millennium B.C.E. texts known as the Astronomical Diaries, part of the Pisces constellation was called DU.NU.NU (Rikis-nu.mi, “the fish cord or ribbon”). There’s some speculation on the part of others that this constellation may have been misinterpreted and turned around so that the northern fish borders with Andromeda instead of being part of Piscis Austrinus.

There’s some thought that this constellation may have represented the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, major landmarks of Mesopotamian maps.

Chinese Mythology

In Chinese Astrology, the constellation of Pisces is actually “broken up” to be part of several constellations. There is Wai-ping, the “Outer Enclosure” that is seen as a fence that keeps a pig farmer from falling into some marshes or cesspit and kept the pigs where they belong. This constellation is represented by the line of stars: Alpha, Delta, Epsilon, Zeta, Mu, Nu, and Xi Piscium. Five stars which include Eta Piscium formed Yougeng, representing the farmer. The marshes or cesspit are represented by the four stars designated Phi Ceti found in the constellation Cetus.

Another constellation called Pili, representing a thunderbolt is formed from a zig-zagging chain of stars from Beta to Iota to Omega Piscium. To the south of this is the constellation Yunyu, formed of four stars representing a cloud and rain. These are just over the western constellation of Pegasus.

In the north part of Pisces, the seven stars that include: Chi, Phi, Upsilon and Tau Piscium the bottom part of a loop-shaped figure known as Kui, after the 15th lunar mansion, the House of the Sandal or Koui-siou. The majority of Kui rests and is found in what westerners know as Andromeda.

Another series of stars, 27, 29, 30 and 33 Piscium, mark the end of another constellation known as Leibizehn, representing a series of fortifications that cross through the Aquarius and Capricornus constellations.

Other names for the Pisces constellation or the ones it is part of are the Dark Warrior, the Northern Emperor and the Pig. After Christian Missionaries made their way to China, the constellation has been known by its western name and called the Two Fishes.

Egyptian Mythology

The ancient Egyptian knew of Pisces, seeing in it a creation story and the “fish of the Nile.” The symbol of Pisces’ two fish has been found on the lid to an Egyptian sarcophagus dating back to 2300 BCE.

German Folklore

A story from Germany tells the story of greedy humans and a wealth-giving fish. It’s a story I remember reading back in grade school. In this story, a man named Antenteh, who was very poor and his wife lived in a small cabin by the sea. The only possessions they had were the cabin and a tub that they filled with feathers to at least have somewhere to rest and sleep.

One day, Antenteh caught a fish that struggled to get free as he pulled it up in his fishing nets. To Antenteh’s amazement, the fish spoke to him, telling Antenteh that he is actually an enchanted prince. The fish told Antenteh that if he released him, he could have anything that he wanted. In the story I read back in school, the fish gives Antenteh three wishes.

Antenteh whose needs are simple and feeling honored at having rescued such an important person refused to accept anything from the enchanted prince. On getting home, Antenteh found that wasn’t to be the case. His wife became very angry for not taking advantage of the opportunity and Antenteh found himself returning to the seashore and called for the fish.

Luckily for Antenteh, the fish came and an embarrassed Antenteh told the fish how the wife wanted a house and furniture for it. The fish told him not to worry and that he would take care of everything. Returning home, Antenteh found that his cabin was now a fine house. Now if Antenteh’s wife hadn’t been so greedy, everything probably would have been fine.

As time progressed, Antenteh’s wife demanded more. She wanted to be a queen and to have a palace and this wish was granted. Still not satisfied, she demanded to become a goddess. That was the straw that broke the camel’s back in this case and the fish now angry at the increasing demands, made everything that Antenteh had been given and wished for vanish and he and his wife were back to having their old cabin and tub full of feathers to sleep in.

In the version of the story that I had read, everything vanishes when the wife makes a fourth wish beyond the third one. It’s still a good cautionary tale about not being too greedy and to learn to be happy with what you’ve got.

Greek Mythology

The Grecian story of Pisces has some relation to the story of Capricorn.

Typhon, a monstrous god attacked the Gods when they were down by the Nile River. In some retellings of the story, the Gods were there in exile or that just happens to be where they were at for one of their many battles with Typhon. In either eventuality, Aphrodite and her son Eros were among the gods along the Nile River’s banks when Typhon appeared to do battle. While Zeus and a couple of other gods fought it out with Typhon, Aphrodite and Eros had leaped into the river, changing into a pair of fish so they could make their escape. In other accounts of the story, Aphrodite and Eros tied themselves together with a rope so they wouldn’t get separated.

Another account of this story places the riverbank that the gods were walking along as being the Euphrates River and not the Nile River. There is also a very similar story found in a Manilius’ five-volume poetic work Astronomica in which the fish that become the constellation of Pisces carried Aphrodite and Eros away to safety.

Keeping with the Euphrates River connection, when an egg fell into this river, a pair of fish pushed it to the shore where doves then sat on the egg to hatch it. When it hatched, Aphrodite came out of the egg. In a show of gratitude, the goddess placed the fish up into the sky to become the constellation Pisces. Through these connections of the myth, Pisces is also known as “Venus et Cupido,” “Venus Syria cum Cupidine,” Venus cum Adone,” “Dione,” and “Veneris Mater.”

Where the constellation of Capricorn was set in the sky to commemorate the humorous half-goat, half-fish form of Pan when he tried to escape; the constellation that has come to be known as Pisces also commemorates this event of Aphrodite and Eros’ forms as the now-familiar Pisces. Also, for those keeping track of the different stories and legends, the Greek story of Pisces came about a hundred years before the Christian account and use of the Pisces constellation.

Judeo-Christian Mythology & Religion

The Jewish holiday of Purim happens around this time. By the Jewish Calendar, Purim happens at the full moon in Adar. For those following the Gregorian Calendars, this is sometime around February and March and the exact date can vary from year to year.

Among Christians, the story of the birth of Christ is said to have happened at the Spring Equinox entering into Pisces and why the “Savior of the World” is known as the Fisher of Men. And this is to parallel the entering into the Age of Pisces.

For those who study astrology, the astrological age is a period of time that is indicative of the kinds of major events of history on the Earth, showing the level of progression or development overall of cultures, politics, and people. You determine the astrological ages by the progression of the equinoxes and one complete cycle of processions is called a Great Year or Platonic Year which takes about 25,920. If you remember the so-called Mayan End Times and date of December 21st, 2012, that was merely the end of their long count Calendar. There can also be a lot of confusion as to just when an Astrological Age is to begin or end as a few different people such as Neil Mann, Heindel Rosicrucian and Shephard Simpson who all have different interpretations to when they begin or end.

This gains significance when you look at the age of Pisces as beginning in 1 C.E. and that it will end in 2150 C.E. The story of Christ’s birth coincides with this time and there are a number of early Christian symbols that use the Pisces symbol of fish. For some, they will point out how Christ is said to have the traits of a Pisces. Then you have the twelve apostles who were told, “Come with me and I will make ye fishers of men.” Early Christians are said to have called themselves “little fishes” and even either the name of the early church or a code name for Jesus was the Greek word for fish, “Ikhthues.” Even Saint Peter is seen as the apostle of the Piscean sign.

Pisces has also been referred to as the “dying god.” Its opposite sign on the Zodiac is Virgo and among Christians, this is the Virgin Mary. Some scholars have gone further with making a connection of Pisces and Christ in scripture, citing Luke 22:10 in which Jesus tells his disciples: “Behold, when ye are entered into the city, there shall a man meet you bearing a pitcher of water… follow him into the house where he entereth in.” that the age to come after Pisces is the Age of Aquarius as the constellation of Aquarius is a man carrying a vase or pitcher of water.

The connection of Pisces to the early Christian religion and symbolism has a stronger tie with the famous story for the “Loaves and Fishes Miracles” where Christ was able to feed the large group of people who followed him.

It’s an interesting look and viewpoint of matching Christianity to the Zodiac.

Syrian Mythology

Many scholars believe that the Greek and Roman versions of the story regarding Pisces come to us from Syria. Here, fish were seen as divine beings and the reports differ if they refused to eat fish altogether or just the ones from Chalos River.

In the Syrian myths, two fish known as Ikhthyes are the ones who rescue Aphrodite and her son Eros. Another myth tells how a large, mysterious egg appeared on the Euphrates River and two fish or half-fish, half-men named Aphros and Bythos brought the egg ashore and hatched it. Once it hatched, out came Ataratheh, whom the ancient Romans and Greeks would have identified with their respective goddesses of Venus and Aphrodite.

Ataratheh is the Syrian goddess of love and fertility. She was often portray and known as the mermaid goddess. Looking at her origin story and that of Aphrodite’s, they are very similar and it could have been easy for the myths of this goddess to move northward into Greece and then Roman where those two cultures adapted her to their pantheons.

A Fish By Any Other Name Is Still A Fish

Pisces was known by the Babylonians as Nunu, by the Persians as Mahik, and the Turks as Balik, all of which mean “Fish” in their respective languages.

The Arabs also knew of Pisces as Al Samakatain, or “the Two Fishes.”

The Syrians viewed fish as sacred animals and refused to eat them.

Originally, only one fish was referred to by many of the older languages for this sign.

The Pisces constellation was also known by the Mayans who saw in its shape a bat instead of fish.

Stars Of Pisces

Alpha Piscium

Alpha Piscium is the name of one star found within the Pisces constellation. In Arabic, it is known as “Al-Rischa,” meaning “the well rope” or “the cord.” The astrologer Ptolemy described Alpha Piscium as the point where the cords holding the two fish were knotted together. The astrological symbol of Pisces shows the two fish as being caught on string either by the mouth or tails. The fish are often shown as swimming in opposite directions and for those who look as Astrology and the Zodiac, this is seen to represent a duality with Piscean personalities.

Beta Piscium

Beta Piscium is known as Fum al Samakah, an Arabic phrase meaning: “mouth of the fish.”

Omicron Piscium

The star or asterism known as Omicron Piscium is also called Torcularis septentrionalis. This name is Latin, meaning “the northern press.” There is some suggestion that this press is to be a grape or olive press. If that were the case, it is no longer certain.

In Chinese astronomy, this star is part of a group of stars known as Yòu Gèng, meaning “Official in Charge of Pasturing.”

Piscids

There are two annual meteor showers that happen every year between the end of Augst and mid-October. The Piscid meteor shower has about 15 meteors per hour and they have been clocked up to 28 kilometers per hour. The other is the Gamma Piscid meteor shower. Of course, successful watching of these meteor showers depends on having a dark night sky.

Vernal Equinox

The constellation of Pisces is considered in the heavens during the Vernal Equinox which is generally around March 21st. The Equinox is the time of year when day and night are at equal lengths of time.

In the Northern Hemisphere, with the Spring Equinox, we see the days begin to get longer and longer until the Summer Solstice before the yearly rotation around the sun and axle tilt makes them appear to grow shorter again.

For the Southern Hemisphere, it is the opposite for them, it is the Autumn Equinox and the days will be getting shorter and shorter until the Winter Solstice and the Earth’s rotation and Axel tilt changes.

Zodiac

In the Greek Zodiac, Pisces marks the first spot of the Zodiac Calendar of which there are twelve Zodiac signs in all. Though many Zodiac Calendars that place Pisces as the twelfth and last sign of the Zodiac. For those who study and are into the classical Greek Zodiacs, this time is typically said to be from February 20 to March 21, right about the time that many Pagans celebrate Ostara. Under the old Roman calendar, March 21 marked the beginning of the New Year. The best time of year to see this constellation is during November about 9 p.m.

Before the discovery of the planet Neptune in 1846, the planet Venus had been the ruling planet. Neptune is now the ruler due to the association of it’s name with the Roman god of the sea, Neptune. In current, modern times, the planets Jupiter and Neptune are said to rule this Zodiacal sign and constellation. Its element is Water, an introverted sign and is one of four mutable signs.

Pisces people can be seen as having a duality in their lives. This duality is due to the perception or belief that Pisces people are seekers of enlightenment and tend to pursue matters of an intellectual and spiritual nature. They are generally viewed as being perceptive, emotional and reasonable. While they can be sensitive and sympathetic, they can also become oversensitive towards others or be very self-indulged in the pursuit of their own pleasures. A Pisces person is thought to be someone who likes to sit on the edge of social gatherings and not get in the middle of things. They can be viewed as being indecisive, passive, weak-willed as they don’t want to offend anybody, over-talkative, possibly confused about issues and this is just due to their flexible natures as they like to hear both sides of an issue and at the same time, they don’t want to offend anyone by taking “too harsh of a stance.” A good point about Pisces is their artistic natures, which again can get them into trouble if they seem to be drift-less and not well grounded.

Aquarius

Aquarius
Etymology – “water-carrier” or “cup-carrier”

Aquarius, like many of the constellations that make up the familiar Western or Greek Zodiac is an old constellation sign. It is known as the Water-Carrier and depicted as a youth carrying a vessel of water. This constellation is located between Capricorn and Pisces. As the 10th largest constellation, Aquarius doesn’t have very many bright stars, so for those out stargazing, they will need a dark sky during the month of October in order to pick it out.

Astronomy & Astrology

Much of the foundations of Western knowledge regarding the fields of Astronomy and Astrology owe its roots to Ancient Mesopotamian cultures. Many ancient cultures studied the stars, seeing in them patterns that are called constellations. These ancient astronomers were able to make predictable, annual turnings of the heavens that they could divide and mark for the passing of the Seasons and time. For the ancients, Astrology served as a precursor to Astronomy and they believed that by studying the heavens, they could foretell future events and even a person’s life path.

These ancient cultures would also meet and exchange ideas frequently and in this fashion, when the Greeks encountered the Persians, there was an exchange of knowledge regarding Astronomy that becomes the constellations and zodiacs so many know today. Eventually, there is no clear distinction between what ancient Mesopotamian Astronomers and Greeks Philosophers knew. Even in current, modern times, the influence of these ancients is still known.

Western Astronomy

Aquarius is one of the oldest recognized constellations and was one of 48 constellations that were identified by Ptolemy, an astronomer who lived during the second century. In modern times, it is one of 88 known or recognized constellations found in an area of the of the night sky known as the Sea or Water due to the number of other constellations with aquatic associations such as Cetus, Delphinus, Pisces and Eridanus.

Greek Mythology

Aquarius is depicted in Greek astronomy as a young man pouring water from a vase or urn into the mouth of Piscis Austrinus, the southern fish. There are a couple of different myths regarding the constellation of Aquarius in Greek Mythology.

Ganymede

Ganymede was the son of King Tros of Dardania and the basis for the kingdom of Troy in Greek mythology. An exceptionally beautiful youth, Ganymede had caught the attention of Zeus when he was out watching over his father’s flock of sheep. Now, depending on the versions of the story being told, Zeus, either in the guise of an eagle or sending the eagle Aquila, came and carried him off to Mount Olympus. As compensation to King Tros, Zeus gives him some horses.

Once there, Ganymede faced the wrath of Hera, the wife of Zeus, who was angry and very likely jealous that her husband had taken such a fancy for a young boy. In addition to this, she was also angry that Zeus intended for Ganymede to replace Hebe, Hera’s daughter as the cup-bearer after an incident where Hebe had accidentally spilled some nectar of the gods. And it couldn’t have set well with Hera that Zeus immortalizes Ganymede in the constellation of Aquarius in addition to immortality and eternal youth.

Another version of this myth says that it was Eos, the goddess of the Dawn who carries off Ganymede to Mount Olympus and then Zeus took him from her to be the cup-bearer.

Regardless of the versions of the story told, Ganymede does become the cup-bearer to the gods and basically serves them their wine. Further variations of this story tell how Ganymede would ride Zeus’ eagle Aquila, accompanying this god on his travels. Both the Aquila constellation near Aquarius and the constellation of Crater, said to be Ganymede’s cup are near Aquarius to complete this story.

Ganymede also becomes deified as he was given immorality and eternal youth by Zeus and ends up being the one responsible for the annual Nile River flooding and the life-giving waters of rain. Some scholars have pointed out that like the story of Capricorn, the Greeks are borrowing from other older stories and cultures as well as coming up with their own stories to explain the images and what the constellations mean.

In Roman times, the name Ganymedes was sometimes used for handsome slaves who served as cupbearers. Furthering this, many have pointed out that the story of Ganymede is a clear indication and precedence for homosexuality in Greek culture. Others, like in Plato’s writings of dialogues between him and Socrates say that it wasn’t homosexuality; point out the meaning of the name Ganymede for “taking pleasure of the mind.” That Zeus loved Ganymede non-sexually for his mind. Still, other sources point out that this is where the Latin word for catamite originates.

The story of Ganymede seems to be related or taken from a Sumerian story of Etana, who descended to the heavens with the help of an eagle while looking for a plant of birth that in turn leads to the birth of his son, Balih.

Grecian Flood Myth

Aquarius, sometimes identified as the god Zeus is the one who causes a great flooding of the earth. A man by the name of Deucalion and his wife, Pyrrha who survived a great flood that washed over the earth. Deucalion had been told by his father, Prometheus in some versions of this story, to build a boat and to fill it with provisions. The two did and they floated in the boat over the sea for nine days and nights before coming to ground on Mount Parnassus.

Safe now, the two found that they were the only survivors and began to wander more as the flood waters receded. Deucalion and his wife couldn’t have been the only survivors of this flood if they were able to consult an oracle who told them to “throw over your shoulders the bones of your mother.”

The solution seemed pretty easy to Deucalion who guessed that the bones of Mother Earth must be stones and so he and Pyrrha began picking up stones to toss over their shoulders. After a bit of this, they looked back and saw that there were now people. The stones thrown by Deucalion had become men and the stones thrown by Pyrrha had become women.

In this myth, Aquarius is seen or becomes a taker as well as giver of life. This myth of a world flood and the rebirth of life on Earth is a very common myth that can be found in numerous cultures around the world.

Sometimes in an effort to have the Grecian Flood myth story parallel the Biblical Flood story of Noah and the Ark, it is Zeus himself who tells Deucalion to build a boat and not Prometheus.

The Death Of Hyas

Hyas was a mighty hunter who ended up being killed while out hunting by either a lion or a boar. On his death, his sisters, known collectively as the Hyades for their brother, were so grievous and weeping for their brother’s loss, that the god Zeus took pity on them and placed them up into the heavens, forming the Hyades asterism and the “V-shape” of the Taurus constellation. The tears of their grief would become associated with the coming of rain.

As for Hyas, the gods placed him up in the heavens to become the Aquarius constellation and the lion that killed him became the Leo constellation. Both were placed on opposite ends of the heavens in order to protect Hyas. Making for the ancient Greeks explanations of why neither constellation appears together in the night sky, so that as one constellation sets in the west, the other is rising in the east.

Arabian Mythology

The Arabs depicted the constellation of Aquarius as a bucket due to their religion forbidding the depiction of humans in art. Sometimes a mule was used in place of showing a human as being the one carrying the buckets or urns of water.

Some of the stars that make up Aquarius also have alternative names in the Arabic language. There is beta Aquarri known as Sadalsuud, from an Arabic phrase “sa’d al-suud,” meaning “luck of lucks.” Then there is alpha Aquarri or Sadalmelik and comes from the expression “sa’d al-malik,” meaning “luck of the king.” As well as, gamma Aquarii or Sadalachbia from another Arabic expression “sa’d al-axbiyah,” meaning “luck of the homes.” And finally there is zeta Aquarri, known as Sadaltager, from the Arabic phrase “sa’d al-tajir,” meaning “luck of the merchant.”

Why is there so much luck? In the Middle Eastern world, when the sun enters Aquarius, that marked the beginning of the New Year and Spring was on it’s way. This would be a time of the life-giving rains that so many depend on, especially the farmers.

Babylonian Mythology

The constellation of Aquarius was well known to the Babylonians who identified it as GU.LA, “The Great One.” There are many Babylonian entitlement stones and cylinder seals dating to the second millennium marked with the astrological symbol of Aquarius, saying it represented the god Ea shown to be pouring water from an urn or holding an overflowing vase. In Babylonian astronomy, Ea is the ruler of the southern quarter of the Sun’s path, the “Way of Ea” and corresponds to a period of 45 days to either side of the winter solstice.

For the Babylonians, the time of Aquarius marks a time of destructive flooding and rainfall, so they often viewed this constellation unfavorably.

The Sumerians viewed Aquarius as responsible for a great flood that covered the earth. The Sumerians also have the story of Etana, a legendary hero-king whose story has been found on several Akkadian seals. According to the Sumerian king list, Etana is one of the kings who ruled the city of Kish after a great deluge or flood. This king’s list also refers to Etana as “the shepherd, who ascended to heaven and consolidated all the foreign countries.”

The Legend of Etana

In this story there is a tree with the eagle’s nest at the top and a serpent at its base. Both creatures have promised the sun god Utu that they will be civil with each other and share their food with their children.

One day, the eagle eats one of the serpent’s children and the serpent cries over this. Utu tells the serpent to hide inside the stomach of a dead bull. When the eagle flies down to eat the dead bull, the snake is able to capture the eagle and throws him in a pit to die of hunger.

Utu then sends a man, Etana to help the eagle and saves it. Etana asks the eagle to help him find the “plant of birth” so that he can sire a son. In gratitude, the eagle helps carry Etana up to the heavens where the god Anu presides. Fearful, Etana has the eagle take him back to the ground. Once he’s gotten his courage up, Etana makes another attempt to go up to the heavens and is successful this time in getting the “plant of birth” and is able to sire his son Balith.

Chinese Mythology

In Chinese astrology, the constellation of Aquarius is found in the northern part of the heavens and symbolized by the Black Tortoise of the North.

In modern Chinese, Aquarius is known as bǎo píng zuò, meaning: “the precious pitcher constellation”. The stream of water flowing out of the Water Jar is depicted as the “Army of Yu-Lin-Kjun,” where “Yu-lin” means “feathers and forest” that represent numerous light-footed soldiers seen in the fainter stars of Aquarius. The stars 88, 89 and 98 Aquarii represent the portion of the constellation called Fou-youe, representing the axes used for weapons and hostage executions. Also found in the constellation of Aquarius is Loui-pi-tchin that represents a rampart stretching out and depicted with the stars 29 and 27 Piscium and 33 and 30 Aquarii through Phi, Lambda, Sigma, and Iota Aquarii to Delta, Gamma, Kappa, and Epsilon Capricorn.

Egyptian Mythology

For the ancient Egyptians, the god Hapi, the god of the Nile River was often identified with Aquarius. He was depicted as carrying a tray of food or pouring water from two large urns. With these urns, Hapi distributed the waters of life as the urns represented good fortune. Sometimes Hapi is shown holding a rod called the Norma Nilotica, that was used for measuring the depths of the Nile River. The time of Aquarius marked the annual flooding of the Nile when the life giving waters from Hapi would be poured out and the people could till their farms along the river’s borders. This annual flooding of the Nile for the ancient Egyptians marked the beginning of spring.

Hindu Mythology

The name of Aquarius in the Hindu zodiac is kumbha meaning: “water-pitcher.” Some feel that this is proof or shows that the influences of the Greek zodiac reached as far as India from Grecian travelers. That might be a bit of a stretch as it may be that the Indian or Hindu story of Varuna, god of the sky and waters is who is represented by the constellation of Aquarius.

This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius

The constellation of Aquarius will be forever immortalized by the counterculture of the 1960’s with the Hippies and their proclamations for the Age of Aquarius and the musical Hair. Truth be told, they were a bit premature by about 600 years for when this time will actually begin.

The astrological age is determined by the name of the constellation in which the Vernal or Spring Equinox occurs, which is close to around March 21st. Right now, we’re still in the Age of Pisces, which will continue until about 2600 C.E. depending on the source.

Sadalsuud

Or beta Aquarri, mentioned up above in the Arabian Mythology section, is the brightest star in the Aquarius constellation. That it is a supergiant star probably helps.

Other notable mentions are some globular clusters of stars of Messier 2 and Messier 72, the asterism Messier 73, along with the Aquarius Dwarf Galaxy. There is also the Saturn Nebula, known as the Waterbearer

Aquariids

There are a series of four meteor showers associated with the constellation of Aquarius. These are the: the March Aquariids, Eta Aquariids, Delta Aquariids, and Iota Aquariids.

Zodiac

The constellation of Aquarius is the eleventh sign of twelve signs that form the Zodiac. For those who study and are into the classical Greek Zodiacs, this time is typically said to be from January 20 to February 18. Due to the changes of the earth’s orbit and tilt, the best time to see this constellation is during October around 9 p.m. The planets Saturn and Uranus are said to rule this Zodiacal sign and constellation. Its element is Air, an extroverted sign and is one of four fixed signs.

Aquarius people are said to be inquisitive, unpredictable, independent, friendly, outgoing, artistic, intellectual, social, stubborn, altruistic and even progressive. At their best, Aquarians are great humanitarians, thinking of others and how to help them. They have an easy with people and are able to interact with a lot of people and relate well with them. At their worst, Aquarians can come across as know-it-alls and become argumentative when trying to get others to see their viewpoints and ideas as correct instead of listening to others or realizing they may have been incorrect.

Aquila

Ganymede

Centaur

Centaur Family
Also called: Kéntauros, Kentauroi or Hippocentaur, Ixionidae, Nubigenae, Centauride or Kentauride for females

Etymology – “piercing bull-stickers” or “bull-slayer”

Pronunciation: {SEN-tawr)

Centaurs are a familiar mythological hybrid creature from Greek mythology. They are frequently depicted as having the upper body of a human from the waist up and a horse’s body from the waist down. They are ultimately the descendants of Ixion, the son of Ares, the God of War. Sometimes, in later myths, the Centaurs are described as having horns, wings or even both.

The Centaurs were believed to have lived in the regions of Arcadia, Magnesia and Mount Pelion found in Thessaly, the Foloi Oak Forest in Elis and the Malean peninsula of southern Laconia. They are often described as eating meat and were known for their reckless and riotous behaviors. This is usually meant to represent a metaphor of being slaves to their more animalistic instincts and drives with their dual natures.

Other tribes or breeds of Centaurs were said to live in western Peloponnese. It is these Centaurs who came to a bad end during a drunk brawl with the hero Hercules. Another Greek writer mentions a tribe of bull-horned Centaurs on the island of Kypros.

Many scholars see Centaurs as the creation of folklore wherein the wild inhabitants of the mountains and spirits of nature are combined into a half-human, half-animal form. In early art, dating back to Assyria around 2,000 B.C.E., Centaurs were shown as humans in front and with the hind legs of a horse attached to them from behind. This image of Chiron often persists in many of these early depictions. Later, the Centaurs are shown as men from the waist up and horse from the waist down. The Centaurs were said to fight, using the branches of trees as weapons, they weren’t known to use bows or archery.

Sometimes they were shown as drunken followers of Dionysus, the god of Wine. Other times, they were often represented drawing the chariot of Dionysus or bound and ridden by Eros, the god of love, in allusion to their drunken and amorous habits. Centaurs are among the first representations used in pottery art among the Greeks.

During Medieval times, Centaurs came to be symbolized as an aspect of the devil and represent violent lusts, adultery, brutality, vengefulness, and heretics. They became the antithesis of knights and horsemen who master their instincts instead of being controlled by them as Centaurs are said to be. Centaurs can be seen in pictures of St. Anthony Abbot who met both a centaur and a satyr when searching for St. Paul the Hermit in the desert. According to some legends, this centaur was the Devil himself. Depictions of Centaurs said to be shown on a number of Pictish carved stones in North-East Scotland. These were outside the limits of the Roman Empire and appear to follow Classical representations and prototypes.

Father of the Centaurs

There are a couple of, though slightly different versions though related stories of how the centaurs came into being.

Ixion

Ixion, the son of Ares, who lusting for Zeus’ wife Hera, was tricked into thinking a cloud, known as Nephele and in Hera’s form was really her. As punishment, Zeus sent Ixion to Tartarus where he was bound to a flaming wheel and from there, the centaurs were born. In this version of the story, the resulting Centaurs were left at Mount Pelion where the Centaur-God Chiron and his daughters took them in to raise as their own. Following this lineage of the Centaurs, they are sometimes called Ixionidae. They could also be described as the nubigenae or cloud-born.

Centaurus

Also spelled as Centauros. In the previous story, instead of multiple centaurs resulting from Ixion’s union with Nephele, it was only one, a deformed human named Centaurus. Centaurus then procreated the species by mating with the Magnesian mares. Some accounts say that Centaurus was the son of Apollo and Stilbe, the daughter of the river god Peneus. In the later versions of this story, Centaurus’ twin brother is Lapithes, the ancestor to the Lapiths and thus making the Centaurs and Lapiths warring cousins.

Zeus

Sometimes, even Zeus himself is mentioned as the father or progenitor of the Centaurs, specifically the breed known as the Hippocentaurs. Zeus had metamorphosed into a horse and through Dia, the wife of Ixion, sired them.

Famous Centaurs

In brief, some of the more famous Centaurs are:

Chiron

Chiron was known for being gentle and wise. He has a linage and parentage different from the other centaurs and as a deity, was immortal until he gave it up to save Prometheus or was killed by an arrow covered with Hydra Poison.

Eurytion

This seems to be the name of two different centaurs and could explain why the Battle with the Lapiths can get intertwined with the incident where the hero Hercules battled and killed a number of the Centaurs.

The first Eurytion led the Centaurs in the battle with the Lapith’s at King Peirithous’ wedding where Eurytion was the one who tried carrying off Peirithous’s wife to rape. He was killed during this battle.

The second Eurytion, from Arcadia has a similar story where he demanded to marry the daughter of King Dexamenus of Olenus. This daughter was either Mnesimache or Deianira. In some accounts of this story, Eurytion threatened violence on Dexamenus’ daughter Hippolyte on the day of her wedding with Azan. When Dexamenus was forced to agree to a marriage, Hercules intervened and ends up killing Eurytion.

Hylaeus

Hylaeus was one of two centaurs foolish enough to try and rape the hero Atalanta. In some accounts, he had attacked and severly hurt Atalanta’s lover Meilanion. In this account, Hylaeus is killed by an arrow shot from Atalanta. In other accounts Hylaeus is said to have been killed during the battle with the Lapiths or that he’s one of the centaurs killed by Hercules.

Hylonome

Hylonome’s claim to fame is being one of the few, if not the only female centaur mentioned in the Greek Myths. Specifically in Ovid’s The Metamorphoses where she is mentioned as the mate to the centaur Cyllarus. When Cyllarus was killed during the battle with the Lapiths, Hylonome took the spear that killed her husband and impaled herself on it as she couldn’t bear living without him.

Pholus

Considered a civilized Centaur like Chiron, Pholus met his end when he invited the hero Hercules to dine with him. All was well until Hercules requested some wine to drink, which Pholus eventually produced. This wine was sacred and a rather potent brew, given to Pholus by the god Dionysus. When the wine was opened, the strong, heady aromas and alcohol lured in the other Centaurs who soon began a drunken brawl. Pholus was killed during this fight either by an accidental arrow shot or dropping a poisoned arrow on his hoof when he went to pull it from a dead comrade. Some scholars will say that either the constellations of Sagittarius or Centaurus represent Pholus.

Nessus

Nessus is a centaur who ran a foul of Hercules and was driven from his home in Arcadia. He set himself up as a ferryman on the river Evenus, claiming that he had been appointed that position by the gods. Later, Nessus found himself with the task of ferrying Heracules’ bride, Deianeira while Hercules crossed the river by himself. Nessus took advantage of the situation in an attempt to rape Deianeira. Hercules stopped this by shooting Nessus with a poisoned arrow. As he was dying, Nessus convinced Deianeira that a love charm made from his blood would insure Hercules’ faithfulness. What Deianeira didn’t know, was this blood was really poison and it is this poison that is responsible for Hercules’ death.

Rhoecus

Rhoecus is the other of two centaurs foolish enough to try and rape Atalanta. He too was killed by an arrow shot by Atalanta.

Centauromachy

Probably the most well known incident involving the centaurs was when they were invited to a wedding. King Peirithous of the Lapiths, had inherited part of Thessaly from his father Ixion. The Centaurs also being descendants of Ixion, claimed they were entitled to part of the land as well. After the first series of battles were fought, Peirithous sought to try and arrange a peace by inviting the Centaurs to the aforementioned wedding.

At this wedding, the Centaurs proceeded to get very drunk, this being their first encounter with wine and alcohol. With their inhibitions lowered, the Centaurs got very violent and riotous. With the centaur Eurytion leading them, they tried to carry off Hippodamia, Pirithous’s bride and the rest of the Lapith women to rape them. This resulted in another battle and the Centaurs were driven off and away from the area.

The hero Theseus, a founder of cities helped Pirithous fight off the Centaurs. Another hero who was present was Caeneus. He was said to be invulnerable to weapons, but that didn’t stop the Centaurs from beating Caeneus into the earth using rocks and branches.

This story is often used to illustrate the struggles and conflicts between barbarism and the more civilized behaviors of society and humankind. Sometimes this battle is connected to the story of Hercules and the Centaurs with their battle that killed so many. Depending on the source of the tale, this event is placed as happening in either Thessaly or in Arcadia. The end result being that the Centaurs are exiled from their home country and end up living on Mount Pindus near Epeirus.

There is a distinction made by Classical Writers that the Centaurs that Hercules fought were the Peloponnesian Centaurs. These Centaurs had fled to the Malean Peninsula in southern Lakonia are Eleusis where the god Poseidon offered them refuge. The Centaurs involved with the incident at King Peirithous’ wedding were the Thessalian Centaurs of Magnesia in northern Greece.

Destruction By The Sirens

In the battle and confrontation with Hercules, those Centaur not killed by this hero met their end when they fled to the Tyrrhenian Strait in what we call now days, Italy. Here they encountered the Sirens who lured them to their deaths with their songs.

Peleus’ Encounters With Centaurs

Peleus was the grandson of Chiron. At one point, he had a friendship with Acastus, one of the Argonauts. Acastus was manipulated into trying to kill Peleus after being told by his wife Astydamia that Peleus had tried to rape her. Acastus hid Peleus’ dagger or sword so he would be defenseless when the Centaurs came to try and kill him. Luckilly for Peleus, Chiron arrived to save him. Chiron is also said to have helped Peleus in succeeding marrying the goddess Thetis.

Achilles And The Centaurs

Achilles was the son of Peleus, making him the great-grandson of Chiron. He was at one point one of Chiron’s many students. This doesn’t seem to have worked out so well as according to Statius’ Achilleid, the Centaurs would complain to Chiron how Achilles would plunder their homes, steal their herds and eventually drove them from their homes.

Possible Reality Behind The Myths

Among historians and anthropologists, the idea is passed around that the legends of Centaurs may have been the first reaction of a culture unfamiliar with horse-back riding seeing peopled mounted on an animal, horses in this case. It could have been easy for people seeing these riders for the first time to see the half-man, half-animal figure. A Bernal Diaz del Castillo reports how the Aztecs thought the same thing when they first saw Spaniards on horseback for the first time. Horse taming and riding first arises out of those cultures living in the grassland steppes of Central Asia or the Middle East.

The Lapiths, kinsmen of the Centaurs from Thessaly were described as the inventors of horse-back riding by Greek writers. In Diodorus Siculus’ Library of History, he describes the Centaurs or Kentauroi as the first to engage in horse riding. Many Thessalian tribes claim their horse breeds come from the Centaurs.

This seems to further make sense of the Centaurs as a case of mistaken identity and really just riders on horseback when looking at the etymology of the word Centaur, meaning “piercing bull-stickers.”

In Palaephatus’ “On Incredible Tales,” mounted archers from a village called Nephele, killed off a herd of bulls that were menacing Ixion’s kingdom.

Babylonian Mythology And Connection

Some scholars, linking the names of the constellations to ancient Babylon, say that the name of Centaur and Centaurus; with its name of “piercing bull,” come from Mesopotamia where it symbolized the god Baal. He represented rain and fertility, fighting with and piercing with horns, the demon Mot who represented the summer droughts. Other sources say that the constellation of Centaurus in Babylonian and Mesopotamian cultures was a Bison-Man and associated with the Sun god Utu or Shamash.

Kentaurides, Female Centaurs!

Well yes, that makes sense when one thinks about it. If there are male centaurs and they were a tribe, wouldn’t there be females as well? A show like “Xena: Warrior Princess” says that all the Centaurs were male but could have intercourse with a human woman and the resulting baby or foal would be a male centaur. Thus they propagated the species that way.

Nor was Disney’s Fantasia the first to show female centaurs.

While the female centaurs or Kentaurides don’t have mention of in early Greek literature and writings, they have appeared in later writings. One female Kentaurides, Hylonome is mentioned by name in a 4th century B.C.E. Macedonian mosaic. It is one of the earliest examples of a female centaur in art.

The Greek Rhetorician, Philostratus the Elder describes the Kentaurides as the sisters and wives of the male Centaurs who live on Mount Pelion with their children. Even the idea of female centaurs is mentioned in Shakespeare’s play King Lear in Act IV, Scene vi, lines 124-125: “Down from the waist they’re centaurs,/Though women all above.”

And Finally! Centaurs In Astronomy!

The name Centaur is given to a classification of celestial objects or Minor Planets that share characteristics of both asteroids and comets. Unlike classic or True Planets, Centaurs don’t have a stable orbit and cross through the paths or orbits between Jupiter and Neptune. The first such Centaur was 944 Hidalgo in 1920, but it wasn’t until the discovery of 2060 Chiron in 1977 that these Minor Planets and Celestial objects were given a name in an attempt to classify them. There’s thought to be some 44,000 of these Centaurs in the Solar System with some of them reaching diameters of 1km. As this field of Astronomy is still new and there’s still lots being learned, different Institutions have different criteria for what makes these celestial objects a Centaur and the classifications are likely to change as more information is gotten.

Modern Astrologers have cheerfully glommed onto some of these Centaurs such as Chiron to adapt and come up with astrological correspondences and information for them.

Capricorn

Capricorn Constellation

Those familiar with Greek mythology, will no doubt be familiar with the image of the Sea-Goat known as Capricorn. The lower half of Capricorn resembles that of a fish, while the upper half is that of a goat. There are a few different conflicting myths regarding the Capricorn constellation.

Astronomy & Astrology

Much of the foundations of Western knowledge regarding the fields of Astronomy and Astrology owe its roots to Ancient Mesopotamian cultures. Many ancient cultures studied the stars, seeing in them patterns that are called constellations. These ancient astronomers were able to make predictable, annual turnings of the heavens that they could divide and mark for the passing of the Seasons and time. For the ancients, Astrology served as a precursor to Astronomy and they believed that by studying the heavens, they could foretell future events and even a person’s life path.

These ancient cultures would also meet and exchange ideas frequently and in this fashion, when the Greeks encountered the Persians, there was an exchange of knowledge regarding Astronomy that becomes the constellations and zodiacs so many know today. Eventually, there is no clear distinction between what ancient Mesopotamian Astronomers and Greeks Philosophers knew. Even in current, modern times, the influence of these ancients is still known.

Western Astronomy

The Capricornus or Capricorn constellation is Latin for “Goat-Horned.” This constellation is one of 48 constellations that were identified by Ptolemy, an astronomer who lived during the second century. In modern times, Capricornus is one of 88 known constellations and is bordered by the constellations of Aquila, Sagittarius, Microscopium, Piscis Austrinus and Aquarius. Many of the constellations bordering with Capricornus are water-related and are located in an area of the sky known as the Sea or Water. The latitude at which the Capricorn constellation appears overhead and can be seen by observers and star gazers is still known as the Tropic of Capricorn. This is when the sun is at its most southerly position during the Winter Solstice. The term also applies to the line on the Earth, on atlases that marks when the sun is directly over head at noon on the Winter Solstice.

Chinese Astronomy

In the Chinese system of Astronomy, the constellation Capricornus is located in The Black Tortoise of the North or Bei Fang Xuán Wu. Its name in modern Chinese is mó jié zuò, meaning “the rub ram constellation.”

Middle Eastern Astronomy

The Arabs, Persians, Turks and Syrians all knew of Capricornus as the Goat. In certain places of the Middle East, the constellation was known as the Southern Gate of the Sun, indicating that it is in this constellation that the Sun reached its lowest point in the solar year before the days become longer and the nights shorter.

Other Cultural Astronomy

The Nakh people call this constellation Negara Bjovnaš, the “Roofing Towers”

In the Society Islands, the figure of Capricornus is called Rua-o-Mere.

The planet Neptune was discovered in Capricornus by German astronomer Johann Galle, on September 23, 1846.

Mesopotamian Mythology

The constellation of Capricornus dates back to the ancient Babylonians and Sumarians. The first recordings and depictions of this constellation date to the 21st century B.C.E. before 1000 B.C.E. It was associated with the planet Saturn and the Mesopotamian god Enki, the Babylonian Ea. In the beginning, Enki was the God of the city Eridu. He was the god of artisanship, water, saltwater, lake water, intellect and creative activity. Enki or Ea was described as being fish-tailed and was called the “Antelope of the Sea.” He was seen as coming up from the abyss of the deep ocean teaching humans knowledge and the wisdom of the gods.

Enki’s symbols were the goat and fish that both combined into the sea-goat. This symbol of a goat-fish represented the great propriety of the buildings of Babylon out of the low, damp lands they were once located in. The horns of the goat represented the towns of Nineveh and Babylon built on the Tigris and Euphrates rivers.

The Capricorn constellation is called “šaxû ibex” in Babylonian. The sun in that month moves into the “suxûru” or fish constellation, which is called the star of Tashmetum, named after a goddess of Akkadian mythology. Tashmetum is the wife of the god known as Nabu. Nabu is the god of wisdom and writing in Babylonian legends. The ancient Babylonians revered Nabu because he was the son of Marduk and his wife, Sarpanitum. Finally, Enki or Ea is Nabu’s grandfather.

Greek Mythology

Amalthea

In one account of Greek mythology, this constellation is the symbol for Amalthea, the she-goat who nursed the god Zeus when he was an infant. Her broken horn that was used to feed Zeus was changed into the horn of plenty or cornucopia. A slight variation to this is that Amalthea is the name of the nymph who raised Zeus and took care of the goat that provided milk and nourishment for him. After Zeus had grown up and was able to over throw his father Cronus, Zeus placed Amalthea up in the heaven in thanks as the constellation of Capricornus.

Cornucopia

The horns from Amalthea the goat later become the Horn of Plenty, or Cornucopia. It is also said that the association with cornucopia is because this is the period of time when the sun is resting and “nourishing itself” before moving northwards on its solar path across the heavens. This was also seen as a symbol of discipline.

Pan

In Greek mythology, Capricorn is known as Pan and he is usually portrayed as the son of Hermes. He had the upper half of a man and the legs of a goat. How Pan becomes associated with the constellation of Capricorn is that one day when Pan and the other Gods were down by the Nile River, they were attacked by the monster Typhon. The Gods all changed themselves into various animals and forms in order to escape. In the confusion and panic, Pan jumped into the Nile River, intending to change into a fish, but only his lower half changed while his upper half turned into a goat. When the other Gods saw this half-goat, half-fish form of Pans, they laughed so much and decided to place an image of it up among the stars where it becomes the Capricornus or Capricorn constellation.

This myth is called “Egyptian” by Gaius Julius Hyginus in his Poetic Astronomy and serves as a way to justify a connection of Greek-Roman Deities with those of Egypt. Something the Romans loved to do, equating all of their gods with those of other cultures. Pan is one example here, as some retellings of this story will call him Aegipan and depending on the source, some scholars will say that Aegipan is a separate deity from Pan, or that he is one of the Panes or many names by which Pan is known.

Aegipan

In a more elaborate retelling of the story of the Greek Gods versus Typhon, while the Gods did change into various animal forms, Zeus changed into the form of the ram, Aries and remained in this form for a while. Other gods like Aphrodite and Eros became a pair of fish that form the constellation of Pisces. Now Aegipan had also transformed himself into an animal to escape Typhon, but he was already halfway submerged in the Nile River when he finally decided what animal form he would be. He had decided to be a goat, but only from the waist up and a fish from the waist down. And its this result of indecision during panic and trying to escape that results in the familiar half-goat, half-fish from of Capricorn.

Zeus finally reappears back in his own form and battles against Typhon, but he was however defeated. Typhon proceeds then to cut out the tendons of Zeus’ hands and feet and therefore unable and helpless to move. Typhon hid the tendons in a cave in the land of Cilicia. The draconic being known as Delphyne, a half-serpent, half-woman creature was tasked by Typhon to guard Zeus’ tendons.

Between the gods Hermes and Aegipan, they were able to steal back Zeus’ tendons and return them so Zeus could become whole again. With his strength restored, Zeus was now able to battle Typhon again and this time, defeated him hurling thunderbolts at him. For Aegipan’s role in this battle the Titan, Zeus set the Capricorn constellation up in the stars to honor him.

Aegipan or Pan?

Well now that all depends… some scholars will say that Aegipan is a separate deity from Pan like Nomios and Phorbas who are collectively called the Panes. Other scholars will say that the Panes are merely different aspects of the same god, in this case, Pan. Additionally, Aegipan is sometimes said to be the father of Pan and not Hermes. It can create for a lot of confusion. Which is what Pan is good at and hence the origin of the word panic.

Winter Solstice

During the early Bronze Age, Capricornus marked the Winter Solstice, the day and time of year when the days are their shortest and the nights are at their longest. Due to the rotational axis shift of the Earth, around 130 B.C.E., the Winter Solstice occurs earlier and no longer in the Capricorn constellation. The solstice still marks the start of the astrological sign of Capricorn in the Zodiac with the sun in Sagittarius.

As of 2002, the Sun now appears in the constellation of Capricornus from January 19 to February 15. In tropical astrology, the Sun is in the sign Capricorn from December 22 to January 20, and in sidereal astrology, this time is from January 15 to February 15.

Zodiac

The constellation of Capricorn is the tenth sign of twelve signs that form the Zodiac. It is the second faintest constellation of the zodiac after the Cancer and can be seen at its brightest in September about four A.M. in the morning.

For those who study and are into the classical Greek Zodiacs, this time is typically said to be sometime from December 22 to January 19. Oftentimes, this is very close to the time and start of the Winter Solstice.

Capricorn is recognized by the name of the “Gate of Death” and is opposite to the constellation Cancer, the “Gate of Birth. “ Capricorn relates to the time the Sun embarks on the tenth part of its orbit and relates to a time of new knowledge. The planet Saturn is said to rule this Zodiacal sign and constellation. Its element is Earth, an introverted sign and is one of four cardinal signs.

Capricorn people or those born under this sign are thought to be well ground and capable of exercising a lot of discipline as needed. They make for great listeners due to their great patience. This ability allows Capricorns a good insight into the lives of other people, traditions and personal histories. They can be very cultured and knowledgeable about the world and society. Capricorns may also care a great deal about personal appearances and perceptions, always seeking to dress neatly or be very stylish. They can be seen as generous, interesting and tactful as dispensers of wisdom.

Sagittarius

Sagittarius
Etymology – The Archer; “sagitta” means “arrow” in Latin. Toxotes in Greek

For those who study either Astronomy or Astrology, the constellation of Sagittarius is easily recognizable by the image of a centaur drawing a bow. It is found between the constellations of Ophiuchus to the west and Capricornus to the east.

Astronomy & Astrology

Much of the foundations of Western knowledge regarding the fields of Astronomy and Astrology owe its roots to Ancient Mesopotamian cultures. Many ancient cultures studied the stars, seeing in them patterns that are called constellations. These ancient astronomers were able to make predictable, annual turnings of the heavens that they could divide and mark for the passing of the Seasons and time. For the ancients, Astrology served as a precursor to Astronomy and they believed that by studying the heavens, they could foretell future events and even a person’s life path.

These ancient cultures would also meet and exchange ideas frequently and in this fashion, when the Greeks encountered the Persians, there was an exchange of knowledge regarding Astronomy that becomes the constellations and zodiacs so many know today. Eventually, there is no clear distinction between what ancient Mesopotamian Astronomers and Greeks Philosophers knew. Even in current, modern times, the influence of these ancients is still known.

Greek Mythology

In Greek mythology, I’ve come across a couple of different stories related to the constellation of Sagittarius.

Chiron

Most people will identify Sagittarius as a centaur, half human, half horse, wielding a bow. Generally this centaur is supposed to be Chiron and in others, it’s the centaur Phollus. Upon their death, they were placed up in the heavens to form the familiar constellation of Sagittarius. More scholarly sources will point out that the story of Chiron is actually more correctly identified with the constellation of Centaurus.

Crotus

Interestingly, it wasn’t until I went looking up information on Sagittarius that I’ve come across the name of this satyr, Crotus. None of the books I have mention, name or come close to referencing him. Everything I’ve come up with on him is through on-line and these sources reference Theony Condos’ book Star Myths and two ancient sources of Eratosthenes (1st/2nd century C.E.) and Hyginus (1st century B.C.E.).

Just who is he? Crotus in the myths I found, place him as the son of Pan and Eupheme, apparently a nursemaid to the Muses and one of the Charities. Eupheme is another name that once I went looking up Crotus, I couldn’t find anything on her in my books except for on-line sources. But I can see why there’s a mix up with Chiron who was peaceful by nature and Crotus who was also peaceful by nature where other Centaurs and Satyrs were known for wild and rowdy behaviors.

But this story makes far more sense for Crotus to be the figure shown in the constellation of Sagittarius. Satyrs, depending on the source and book read, are sometimes described as having a horse’s tail along with the hooves and goat-like horns. And in the myths that I’ve found regarding Crotus, he’s described as being a very skilled hunter and the inventor of the bow. So well loved was he by the muses that they asked Zeus to place Crotus up among the stars to be commemorated as a constellation.

Perhaps in a vague effort to connect Sagittarius with its earlier Babylonian astronomy, the constellation of Sagittarius is said to aiming an arrow at the constellation of Scorpio, specifically the star called Antares, the heart of the Scorpion.

Babylonian Mythology

The constellation of Sagittarius was well known to earlier civilizations in the Middle East and Mesopotamian cultures. When the twelve constellations were listed sometime around the third millennium B.C.E., Sagittarius, the Archer was on it. It’s generally agreed by many that the Babylonian’s constellation of Sagittarius later becomes the root of the Greek Sagittarius mythology.

In some myths, the character of Enkidu, a feral man raised by beasts, was seen represented in the constellation of Sagittarius. Enkidu was a close friend and companion to Gilgamish of the city Uruk. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Nergal, the god of war is found on two cuneal inscriptions. In Sumerian, Nergal’s name means “Lord of the Great Dwelling,” that is the Underworld. Nergal was one of seven deities to whom sacrifices and offerings of sheep and cattle were made. Nergal was originally associated with fire and the heat of the sun. One of his epitaphs is sarrapu, “the Burner.” He later came to be seen as a god of War, Pestilence and Devastation.

The Babylonians saw Nergal in the constellation of Sagittarius. Nergal was said to be a strange centaur-like creature firing a bow. One source states that this image is usually depicted with wings, two heads, one being a panther, the other a human head and a scorpion’s stinger raised above it instead of a horse’s tail.

The Sumerian’s also saw their god Pabilsag. This deity’s name is comprised of two words, the first being Pabil, meaning “elder paternal kinsman” and Sag, meaning “chief head.” The thought or idea is that the name can then translate to “Forefather” or “Chief Ancestor.” Pabilsag’s look contains several complex characteristics not interpreted in the Greek icon of a centaur. Pabilsag had a scorpion’s tail, a dog’s head and wings. In other variants the characteristics are altered, the dog’s head or wings could be overlooked all together, while in other icons bird like feet supplant the scorpion’s tail.

Some scholars like to try making a connection of the Greek Sagittarius to the ancient Babylonian constellation through the etymology of words. With how Sagittarius is from the Latin meaning the Archer. This is translated from the word Sagitta meaning an arrow. This is then translated from the Greek word Taxotes, meaning the Archer, and when translated to the Akkadian language, is Nedu the Soldier. Once more this gets translated to the Sumerian word “Us,” meaning the Soldier). And ultimately, it is finally translated to the Sumerian words Pa.bil.sag, meaning the Archer.

The Arabs named a number of the brighter stars in the constellation after parts of the human body and for parts of a bow and arrow, indicating that they too associated this constellation with an archer. One star, called Nunki, is a fairly recently used name by navigators and comes from a list of Babylonian star names. The name Nun-Ki was the name of a group of stars representing the Babylonian’s sacred city of Eridu on the Euphrates River. This name is now used exclusively for the star Sigma Sagittarii, and is considered to be the oldest star name in use.

Chinese Astronomy

For the Chinese, they view the constellation of Sagittarius as two separate constellations of the seventh and eighth lunar mansions called Ji and Dou Ji, representing a winnowing basket used for separating rice grains from their chaffs. The chaff was represented by a single star called Kang. A related constellation called Chu, the pestle is to the south of Ji, used for pounding the rice to remove the husks.

Dou, “dipper” or Nandou “southern dipper” was formed by the stars Mu, Lambda, Phi, Sigma, Tau and Zeta Sagittarii. This constellation is also called the Milk Dipper. In Chinese proverbs, the southern dipper marks life while the northern dipper, Beidou, the familiar Big Dipper found as part of Ursa Major, marks death. A solitary star nearby was called Nongzhangren, an old farmer, measures out the grains in the dipper and winnowing basket.

North of Dou, an arc of stars, Upsilon, Rho, 43, Pi, Omicron and Xi Sagittarii is called Jian and represents a banner, possibly at a city gate. Next to it is Tianji, the “celestial cock” who is in charge of time as they’re the first to crow the dawn while all the other birds follow it.

To the south of Tianji are two canine related constellations. Gouguo which consists of stars Omega, 59, 60 and 62 Sagittarrii. The name Gouguo translates to “territory of dogs” or “dog kingdom” and could represent a nation of Chinese myth and history, possibly the Mongols. Next to Gouguo, is Gou, formed by the stars 52 and Chi-1 Sagittarii, and is said to represent a guard dog.

In the southern part of Sagittarius, a group of ten stars formed the constellation Tianyuan and represented a body of water such as a lake or ocean. Tianyuan was said to control or govern the irrigation of fields. A group of fainter stars in Sagittarius on the border with the constellation Ophiuchus form part of another constellation, Tianyue. This constellation lay on an ecliptic threshold and represented a lock or keyhole through which the Sun had to pass every year. It lays directly opposite in the heavens from Tianguan, a gate on the edge of Taurus.

The Teapot

The eight brightest stars of Sagittarius form an easily recognizable, smaller constellation or asterism known as the “the Teapot.” Four stars form the body of the pot, while other stars form the lid, spout and even the handle. Another smaller group of these stars form a ladle shape called the Milk Dipper. Ancient Chinese astronomers also saw a dipper among these same stars as mentioned above.

The Galactic Center!

According to Astronomers, the constellation of Sagittarius sits at the center of the Milky Way galaxy as it is at its densest there. Many star clusters and nebulae are also found within the constellation of Sagittarius. Some of these nebulae are the Lagoon Nebula, the Omega Nebula, which is also called the Loon, or Swan or even the Horseshoe Nebula, and the Trifid Nebula. The brightest star cluster is called Messier 55. In addition to all this, it is believed that the exact center of the Galaxy is marked by a radio signal that astronomers call Sagittarius A.

Zodiac

The constellation of Sagittarius is the ninth sign of twelve signs that form the Zodiac. For those who study and are into the classical Greek Zodiacs, this time is typically said to be from November 21 to December 21. Due to the changes of the earth’s orbit and tilt, the best time to see this constellation is during early summer. The planet Jupiter is said to rule this Zodiacal sign and constellation. Its element is Fire, an extroverted sign and is one of four mutable signs.

Sagittarius people are said to like being straight forward, getting to the heart of the matter with honesty. Sometimes their sense of honesty and truthfulness can hurt as they may not necessarily sugar coat anything. A younger Sagittarius will be rather abrasive about this, sometimes coming off as a smart alec whereas an older Sagittarius has learned to better temper their words will still being very frank and forthright. A Sagittarius person may also aspire to a lot of athleticism, philosophy, scholarly pursuits, travel, adventure or high and noble ideals. They’re known for being loyal and being those who can give as well as effectively follow directions.

Andromeda

Andromeda

Etymology – “Ruler of Men”

Pronunciation: {an-drahm’-uh-duh}

As found in Greek legends, the story of Andromeda begins with King Cepheus and Queen Cassiopeia, the rulers of ancient Aethiopia. Cassiopeia in her arrogance boasted how her daughter, Andromeda was more beautiful than the Nereids. This kind of attitude of extreme arrogance and pride, especially when a person claims to be better than the gods, creates what’s known as hubris.

Offended by Cassiopeia’s remarks, the Nereids approached Poseidon and complained, asking him to punish this mortal woman. Poseidon agreed and he sent a flood as well as the sea monster Cetus to destroy the coastline of Aethiopia.

After consulting with the oracle of Ammon, Cepheus was told that he would be able to end the destruction of his country by giving up his daughter Andromeda in sacrifice to Cetus. At the urging of his people, Cepheus had Andromeda chained to a rock by the sea to await her fate.

Luckily for innocent Andromeda, the hero Perseus was flying over head on his way home from his recent quest to slay the gorgon Medusa, when he spotted her. When Perseus learned of the situation, he waited at the rock with Andromeda until Cetus arrived to claim her. With the aid of Hades’ helmet of invisibility, Perseus stayed hidden and used Medusa’s Head to slay the sea monster when it came in close, turning it to stone.

The monster slain, Perseus then claimed his right to marry Andromeda. Given how he had rescued her, both Cepheus and Cassiopeia readily agreed to this as not only was their daughter saved but so was their kingdom.

The story doesn’t completely end there as it seems Andromeda had also been promised to her uncle Phineus to marry. This wouldn’t have been disputed or contested if Phineus had actually been the one to save Andromeda and slay Cetus himself. So Phineus picked a fight with Perseus about his right to marry Andromeda at the wedding.

After slaying a Gorgon and a Sea Monster, a mere mortal man is no challenge for Perseus who once again pulls out Medusa’s head and turns Phineus to stone. With that final problem solved, Andromeda accompanies Perseus back to his home Tiryns in Argos where they eventually founded the Perseid dynasty.

Some accounts give that Perseus and Andromeda had seven sons and two daughters. Others place this count a little differently saying it’s seven children all together, six sons and one daughter. Most accounts agree that the eldest son, Perses founded his own kingdom and becomes the ancestor to the kings of Persia.

Years later, when Andromeda dies, the goddess Athena places her in the heavens to become a constellation next to Perseus. Other constellations of Cassiopeia, Cepheus and Cetus also immortalize and commemorate this story.

Aethiopia or Ethiopia?

The accounts can vary and much of this owes to some lack of clarity among the ancient Greek Scholars and Historians. Homer is the first to have used the term Aethiopia in his Iliad and Odyssey. Greek historian Herodotus uses the name Aethiopia to describe all of the inhabited lands south of Egypt. The name also features in Greek mythology, where it is sometimes associated with a kingdom said to be seated at Joppa, (what would be modern day Tel-Aviv) or it is placed elsewhere in Asia Minor such as Lybia, Lydia, the Zagros Mountains and even India.

Modern day Ethopia is located on the horn of Africa and has some tentative ties to the legend of Andromeda. The Egyptian priest Manetho, who lived around 300 BCE called Egypt’s Kushite dynasty the “Aethiopian dynasty.” And with the translation of the Hebrew Bible or Torah into Greek around 200 BCE, the Hebrew usage of “Kush” and Kushite” became the Greek “Aethiopia” and “Aethiopians.” This again changes later to the modern English use of “Ethiopia” and “Ethiopians” with the arrival of the King James Bible.

Given the way that Countries, Empires, Kingdoms and Nations rise and fall, expand and shrink, it’s very well possible that both Aethiopia and Ethiopia are one and the same and that modern day Tel-Aviv once known as Joppa (Jaffa) may have once been part of Ethiopia. There is a lot of history that has been lost to the sands of time that can only be guessed at and speculated upon.

Western Astronomy

The constellation known as Andromeda is one of 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy in his book, Almagest. Today it remains as one of the 88 current or modern constellations. Arab astronomers were aware of Ptolemy’s constellations, but they included a second constellation representing a fish at Andromeda’s feet. An Arab constellation called “al-Hut,” the fish is composed of several stars in Andromeda and from several stars in Pisces.

The Andromeda constellation is found on the northern hemisphere where it can most likely be seen during autumn evenings, along with several other constellations named after characters in the myth of Perseus. Because of its northern location, Andromeda is only visible north of the 40° south latitude line and for observers farther south it lies below the horizon. It is one of the largest constellations found in the night sky.

In English, Andromeda is known as the “Lady in Chains” or “the Chained Woman.” It is known as Mulier Catenata in Latin and al-Mar’at al Musalsalah in Arabic. This constellation has also been called Persea, meaning “Perseus’s wife” or Cepheis, meaning “Cepheus’s daughter,” all names that relate this constellation back to its Greek legend of Perseus.

Chinese Astronomy

In traditional Chinese astronomy, nine stars from Andromeda along with seven stars from Pisces, form an elliptical constellation called Kui or “Legs.” This constellation is either represented as the foot of a walking person or a wild boar. The star called Gamma Andromedae and ten neighboring stars were called “Tianda jiangjun.” They represented a great general of the heavens and his ten subordinate officers. The ten stars in the north and center of Andromed formed Tianjiu, a stable from which horses were dispatched for riders. Lastly, other stars in the western part of Andromeda form a constellation known as Tengshe, a flying snake.

The name of the Andromeda constellation in modern Chinese is xiān nǚ zuò, meaning “the immortal woman/fairy constellation”. This constellation lies across two cardinal points or directions which are symbolized by the Black Tortoise of the North and the White Tiger of the West of Chinese astrology.

Hindu Mythology

Interestingly enough too, there is a very similar figure in ancient Sanskrit texts that depict an Antarmada chained to a rock, as in the Greek myth. Scholars believe that the Hindu and Greek astrological myths were closely linked; one piece of evidence cited is the similarity between the names “Antarmada” and “Andromeda”.

Mesopotamian Mythology

Many people are familiar with the story of Andromeda and her strong connection with Greek traditions. The story and constellation probably go back even further as there is also a similar female figure in Babylonian astronomy. The stars that make up the constellation of Pisces and the middle portion of Andromeda formed a constellation representing a fertility goddess, sometimes called Anunitum or the Lady of the Heavens.

Andromeda is also associated with the Mesopotamian creation story of Tiamat, the goddess of Chaos. She bore many demons for her husband, Apsu, but eventually decided to destroy them in a war that ended when Marduk killed her. He used her body to create the constellations as markers of time for humans.

Micronesian Mythology

In the Marshall Islands, the constellations of Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Triangulum, and Aries are all part of the same greater constellation representing a porpoise. Andromeda’s bright stars form the body of the porpoise; Cassiopeia represents it’s tail and Aries its head.

Polynesian Mythology

In the Tuamotu islands, Andromeda’s stars, Alpha Andromedae are called Takurua-tuki-hanga-ruki and Beta Andromedae was called Piringa-o-Tautu.

Perseus Family

The constellation of Andromeda, along with eight other constellations of: Auriga, Cassiopeia, Cepheus, Cetus, Lacerta, Pegasus, Perseus, and Triangulum.

All of these constellations have some connection to the overall legend and myth of the Grecian hero Perseus.

The Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy, which naturally enough gets its name from the Andromeda Constellation, is also found here. The Persian astronomer, Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi first wrote about the Andromeda Galaxy in his “Book of Fixed Stars” around 964. Star charts of this period labeled it as the Little Cloud. The first telescopic observations were done by German astronomer Simon Marius on December 15, 1612. And the first photographs were taken in 1887 by Isaac Roberts from his private observatory in Sussex, England.

The Andromeda Galaxy is approaching the Milky Way at a rate of about 100 to 140 kilometers per second. That is roughly 400 light-years every million years. At that rate, the Milky Way and Andromeda Galaxies are expected to collide in about 4.5 billion years. What’s likely to happen? No one knows for sure, though there is speculation among the Science-Minded that the two galaxies will merge together to form a giant elliptical galaxy. But not to worry, such collisions and merging of galaxies are fairly common in the universe.

Andromedids

Every November there is a meteor shower that has come to be known as the Andromedids due to where it appears to originate from, the Andromeda constellation. This is a weak meteor shower in that they are slow, averaging fewer than two meteors per hour. Observers of the Andromedids have noted meteors also coming in from other constellations. The last and biggest Andromedids meteor shower was in December of 2011. Astronomers have predicted based on this and past observed history, that there will be another outburst or large meteor showers in 2018, 2023 and 2036.