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Category Archives: Cleanliness/Sanitation

Amu Nowruz

Amu Nowruz

Alternate Spelling: Uncle Nowruz

Also called: Persian – عمو نوروز

Etymology: Uncle Nowruz or Uncle New Year.

The figure of Amu Nowruz is a familiar one in Iranian and other Middle Eastern cultures for their celebrations of New Year that coincides with the official start of Spring.

In Iranian tradition, Amu Nowruz appears every year at the start of Spring along with his companion Haji Firuz. Their appearance marks the beginning of Nowruz, the New Year.

Amu Nowruz is often depicted as an elderly, silver or white-haired man wearing a felt hat, long blue clock, sash, pants, sandals, and carrying a walking stick. Amu Nowruz’s role is to pass on the story of Nowruz to the young.

Naneh Sarma And Amu Nowruz

One thing I found of interest is learning about Amu Nowruz’s wife, Naneh Sarma. There’s a love story wherein they only meet each other once a year.

According to the one story found, every year, on the Spring Equinox, Mother Simorq flies down from Mount Qâf with Amu Nowruz, the Young Man Spring. Once Simorq has dropped off Amu Nowruz, he heads for a chestnut colored horse waiting for him. Amu Nowruz will then ride the horse out over the plains towards the city gates where he will meet Naneh Sarma, Grandmother Frost in her orchard just outside the city walls.

Amu Nowruz and Naneh Sarma were madly in love with each other and the first day of Spring,  Naneh Sarma cleans her house and prepares for Amu Nowruz’ arrival. Naneh Sarma waits a long time for Amu Nowruz’s arrival. Long enough that she falls asleep.

By the time Amu Nowruz arrives, he finds Naneh Sarma fast asleep. Instead of waking her, Amu Nowruz leaves a flower he picked for Naneh Sarma on her lap. He then proceeds make himself a glass of tea and stoke the fire so it doesn’t die down. After all this, Amu Nowruz then heads on into the city, bringing Spring time with him.

Shortly after, Naneh Sarma wakes up and finds the flower that Amu Nowruz left and the other signs of his having been there. She weeps finding that her lover has come and gone again. Mother Simorq comes to Naneh Sarma to comfort and remind her that she will have to wait another year for Amu Nowruz’s arrival without falling asleep.

Mother Simorq then carries Naneh Sarma back up to Mount Qâf as she begins to melt. On the top of the Mountain, Mother Simorq lays Naneh Sarma down as she completely melts, knowing that if Naneh Sarma and Amu Nowruz should ever meet, the world would end.

Nowruz – The Persian New Year

Amu Nowruz’s role in the New Year’s celebration is one very similar to that of Santa Claus or Sinterklaas with the celebration of Christmas in that of one whom is bringing gifts. Depending on the country and the calendar used, Nowruz is celebrated close to the Spring or Vernal Equinox, often close to somewhere between March 19 to March 22.

Nowruz is Persian for “New Day,” marking the first day of the month Farvardin and the first day of Spring in the Iranian calendar. The celebration of Nowruz has its roots in ancient Persian traditions of Zoroastrian religion. Some scholars suggest that the celebration may even be older and have roots in Mithraism. It has survived some 3,000 years and varies a bit in celebration from one country to another, especially among the Middle Eastern cultures, mainly Iranian.

Heralding the start of Nowruz, Hajji Firuz is often seen parading through the city with a troupe of singers and dancers following him. Accompanying him is Amu Nowruz bringing and bearing gifts where Hajji Firuz is the one to demand and expect them.

With Nowruz, the New Year’s Day must start off with an atmosphere of joy and happiness so that families may continue to know joy throughout the coming year. The arrival of Hajji Firuz is important for bringing the necessary spirit of joy and happiness to accompany the New Year. This same spirit of joy and happiness is necessary too, for without it, the faravahars (similar to guardian spirits or angels) will leave the household, taking with them the family’s blessings, abundance and luck for the coming year.

Shahnameh – The Book Of Kings

The Shahnameh is an epic poem written by the Persian poet, Ferdowsi sometime between 977 and 1010 C.E.

What’s significant is that this poem dates the celebration of Nowruz to the reign of Jamshid, who in Zorastrian texts saves all of mankind from a killer winter that would have killed every living creature. This mythical Persian King likely represents or symbolizes the transition of people going from animal hunting to animal husbandry and the eventual more settled, civilized eras of human history.

Jamshid is credited with the founding of celebrating Nowruz. According to the text of the Shahnameh and Iranian mythology, Jamshid created a throne embedded with gemstones. Sitting on the throne, he had demons raise him up above the earth into the heavens where he sat like the sun, shining brightly. The creatures of the world would gather around Jamshid and scatter gems around him. This started the day known as the New Day or Nowruz and marking the first day of the month of Farvardin.

Persian scholar Abu Rayhan Biruni, about 10th century C.E. notes in his Kitab al-Tafhim li Awa’il Sina’at al-Tanjim, the Persian belief that Nowruz marks the first day that the universe begins.

UN Recognition Of Nowruz

While it goes slightly off topic of focusing on Amu Nowruz, I feel it’s important to mention that in 2010, the UN General Assembly recognized March 21st as the International Day of Nowruz. It is recognized as an ancient Persian festival for Spring that has been celebrated for over 3,000 years.

Where for Christians, the celebration of Christmas is often used to promote peace and goodwill, so too does the celebration of Nowruz during Spring. That having more of the world, the global community be better familiar with the significance of Nowruz and its meaning, it will help promote more cultural understandings, friendships, peace and hopefully long lasting respect.

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Aralez

Aralez
Also known as: Arles, Arlez, Aralezs (plural), Aralezner (plural), Jaralez

The Aralezner are an ancient race of dog-like beings, either spirits or minor gods with the powers of healing and resurrection in Armenian mythology. The Aralez is known for reviving fallen warriors and resurrecting the dead by licking their wounds clean. One minor article mentioned that the revived warriors spend the rest of their days “bereft of their spiritual aspects.” What that would seem to me, could mean that a resurrected warrior is living on borrowed time and possibly won’t get a second time for resurrection. When their time is up, they move to whatever fate the afterlife holds for them.

The Aralezner are believed to live in the sky or on Mount Massis, modern day Mount Ararat. The breed of dog known as the Armenian Gampr is said to be what the Aralezner look like. They are one of the oldest dog breeds found in Armenia, retaining many of their ancestral traits.

Armenian Historical Connections

Mushegh Mamikonyan – When the Sparapet Mushegh Mamikonyan died, his family placed his body in a tower. They had hoped that the Aralezner would come and lick him, bringing Mushegh back to life.

Ara the Beautiful – Ara is one of Armenia’s legendary patriarchs. In the legend surrounding Ara, he is a warrior whose handsomeness attracted many marriage proposals from Queen Semiramis. When Ara turned down Semiramis advances in favor of marrying Nvard, an angry, rejected Semiramis sent soldiers to go kill Ara and bring his body back to her. According to legend and story, Semiramis is to have prayed for Ara’s resurrection.

In Armenian legend, there are many versions of the story of Ara the Beautiful and Semiramis. One variation to this story has the Aralezner licking Ara’s wounds and resurrecting him. Another version has Ara accidentally killed during war and that his body was then placed up on the mountains for the gods to resurrect.

What all the different versions of the legend do agree on is that Ara was never resurrected and that Semiramis very likely took a man or another lover who looked like Ara the Beautiful and claimed that this was Ara returned to life by the gods or Aralezner.

Wound Licking

There could be some truth to this concept of wound licking and healing. First is that wound licking is an instinctive response in humans and many animals such as cats, dogs, primate and rodents to lick an injury.

What’s notable and for certain is that the salvia can aid in cleaning a wound, removing anything that is possibly contaminating it. Where dogs are concerned, their saliva does have antibiotic properties, particularly lysozyme, an enzyme that is known for breaking down the cell walls of certain harmful bacteria. Namely gram-positive bacteria. The enzyme is able to attach to the bacteria’s cell wall and weakening it so that it ruptures or breaks.

The next reasoning is that the act of licking stimulates the tissues and small blood vessels around the wound, increasing blood flow that brings white blood cells and platelets to speed up the healing process.

Historical, Modern And Mythical Connections

Many cultures have believed that a dog’s saliva has a healing power on people. There is a French saying that “Langue de chien, langue de médecin” or “A dog’s tongue is a doctor’s tongue.” There is too a Latin quote that appears in a thirteenth-century manuscript that goes: “Lingua canis dum lingit vulnus curat” or “A dog’s tongue, licking a wound, heals it.” In the Christian Bible, Luke 16:19-31, there is the story of Lazarus the Beggar whose sores are licked by dogs. However there is no miraculous healing mentioned.

In Ancient Greece, dogs at Aesculapius’ shrine were trained to lick patients. During the Medieval Ages, Saint Roch is said to have been cured of sores by his dog licking him. Even in the nineteenth century, it was believed in the Scottish Highlands that a dog licking wounds or sores would be an effective treatment.

More modernly is a report of dog saliva being used to speed up wound healing in the Lancet medical journal. And Fijian fisherman allow for dogs to lick their wounds to speed up the healing process.

Risks

There are risks involved with wound licking, such as doing too much of it. Plus there is the likeliness of causing the very same infections that are thought to be avoided.

While there are historical and mythical instances of wound licking having healed people, there are many modern day documented cases of infections from wound licking by an animal. Especially if a person’s immune system is already compromised or weakened.

Dua

Dua

This is one of those…. what on earth Deities I came across while researching and looking up information regarding Egyptian Gods at one point.

Interestingly, Dua is a very minor ancient Egyptian god of Toilets. The information on him is very sparse and what little bit I found isn’t much.

In being a God of Toilets, it means that he is a god of sanitation and the cleanliness of lavatories. One more minor source mentions he is a god of shaving.

Adoration

There is the word dua that’s found in ancient Egypt. The hieroglyph for it shows a figure with outstretched arms that are raised up. The image represented worship and adoration as it was a gesture made before all images of the gods and before approaching the Pharaoh.

That’s about all she wrote…

There was mention of Dua as a god of the stomach and protector of the dead. That lead seems to be a mistaking of Dua’s name with that of another deity, Duamutef, one of the four sons of Horus and protector god for organs kept in Canopic Jars after they’ve been removed during mummification.